The Isle of Rum: Complete Visitor Guide

The Small Isles on the west coast of Scotland include Canna, Muck, Eigg, and Rum. Rum is the largest of the archipelago at 182 square miles, yet it is inhabited by just 40 people.

Getting to Rum involves a short ferry ride from the neighbouring Isle of Skye, after which visitors are free to explore mile after mile of heather-covered moorlands and dramatic mountain peaks.

The Isle of Raasay: Complete Visitor Guide

The Isle of Raasay is located immediately north of Skye on the west coast of Scotland.

This beautiful island in the Inner Hebrides is just 24 square miles in area yet is home to one of the world’s most geologically diverse landscapes.

Visitors to Raasay can explore rolling hills, forests, lochs, golden beaches, and some of the most off-the-grid roads in Scotland.

The Isle of Lunga: Complete Visitor Guide

The Isle of Lunga lies west of Mull and east of Tiree on the west coast of Scotland. This remote volcanic island is the largest of the Treshnish Isles, yet it’s only 81 hectares in size.

Visitors can explore Lunga as part of an organized tour to see the island’s famous colonies of puffins, as well as thousands of pairs of breeding seabirds, seals, and rare plants.

The Isle of Coll: Complete Visitor Guide

The Isle of Coll lies on the edge of Scotland’s west coast, directly north of Tiree and west of Mull.

This stunningly pretty island is surrounded by miles of pristine golden beaches and has vast swathes of unspoilt countryside at its centre.

Coll is also pleasingly free of tourism, making a visit to this gem of an island a real step back in time.

Glen Ogle – Stirling: Complete Visitor Guide

Glen Ogle lies in a particularly scenic area of Stirlingshire, 2 miles northwest of the village of Lochearnhead.

The Glen is a popular tourist destination thanks to the Sustrans Route 7 which offers a superb cycle and walking route through the glen, where stunning views are on offer from Loch Earn to the Glen Ogle railway viaduct and beyond.

Seacliff Beach – East Lothian: Complete Visitor Guide

Seacliff Beach is situated 5 miles south of North Berwick in East Lothian.

This remote beach is overlooked by the dramatic ruins of Tantallon Castle and is best known for its unusual sandstone harbour which is said to be the smallest in the UK.

Preston Mill – East Lothian: Complete Visitor Guide

Preston Mill is located next to the River Tyne in picturesque farming country in the heart of East Lothian.

The mill dates from the 18th-century and was used commercially until the 1950s but is now open as a tourist attraction managed by the National Trust for Scotland.

Discover this unique historic attraction with this guide which includes a 360° virtual tour.

Silver Sands of Morar – Inverness: Complete Visitor Guide

The Silver Sands of Morar are a series of celebrated beaches located on the Morar Peninsula, south of Mallaig.

These stunning white-sand beaches are a favourite spot for tourists due to the crystal-clear turquoise waters along this stretch of coastline, as well as the stunning views of the Small Isles.

The Fairy Glen – Skye: Complete Visitor Guide

The Fairy Glen is an ethereal, bizarre-looking landscape located on the west side of Trotternish on the Isle of Skye.

This geological wonder comprises a number of conical hills that look man made but are, in fact, remnants of an ancient landslip similar to the equally captivating Quiraing.

Bealach na Ba – Wester Ross, Highland: Complete Visitor Guide

The Bealach na Ba is a twisting mountain pass on the Applecross Peninsula in Wester Ross, Highland.

This single-track road rises over 2,000 feet (0.61 km) at its highest point and is famous for being one of the most scenic drives in the world, as well as one of the most dangerous due to its tight hairpin bends.

Camera Obscura and World of Illusions – Edinburgh: Complete Visitor Guide

Camera Obscura and World of Illusions – located near Edinburgh Castle – is one of the oldest purpose-built attractions in Scotland.

Visitors can experience six floors of interactive displays with exhibits that showcase optical illusions including holograms, a mirror maze and a spinning vortex tunnel.

Princes Street Gardens – Edinburgh: Complete Visitor Guide

Princes Street Gardens in Edinburgh is one of the largest public spaces in the city. Originally a body of water called the Nor Loch, the gardens were designed in the 1770s but weren’t created until 1820 when the loch was drained.

Today, the gardens are a popular recreational area that features a number of popular landmarks including The Scott Monument, The Ross Fountain and The Ross Bandstand.